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Loyal to the Badge-Philosophy

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Read the case study entitled Loyal to the Badge that you find in the reading assignment. Note: The link included in the case study is no longer available at that site. Here is an alternate link for the same article that provides more information: https://positiveleo.wordpress.com/2009/09/10/year-of-living-dangerously-takes-toll-on-memphis-cop/ Afterward, read the research article entitled “Rethinking Company Loyalty” by Lauren Keller Johnson: http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/rethinking-company-loyalty Briefly answer the questions, and keep to a word count of 400-700 words: The two ideas on which company loyalty—or organizational loyalty to broaden the title—is built are the following: An attachment to the organization that is noninstrumental, meaning the attachment is not maintained only because it serves the employee’s concrete interests, such as the need for a salary. A deposited value in the organization that goes beyond any individual and their attachment: the organization’s value continues even without those who currently feel it. 1. How are these ideas manifested in the case of April Leatherwood? 2. Three measures on the scale of loyalty intensity are obedience loyalty, balanced loyalty, and free agency. Given what you’ve read about Leatherwood, where would you put her on this scale? Why? 3. Leatherwood’s pay is not high, about $50,000 a year. That works out to about $7 an hour for the twelve undercover months. Obviously she enjoyed no status while she was undercover. Now, however, she has appeared in the newspaper and made detective grade in the department. In your opinion from what you’ve read, do you believe she has acquired a level of status through her work? If she has acquired a status, how would you describe it, what is it based on, how is it different from the status enjoyed by, say, a senator or a movie star? Does this status—assuming she’s acquired it—compensate what she suffered? Explain 4. Now compare or contrast the case study of Loyal to the Badge to that of Rethinking Company Loyalty. *Please remember to use in-text citations and create a reference list. Reference Johnson, L. K. (2005). Rethinking company loyalty. Harvard Management Update, 10(3). Retrieved from http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/rethinking-company-loyalty. **************CASE STUDY************* When police officer April Leatherwood went undercover in Memphis, she changed her name to Summer Smith. She didn’t change her socks for a year—no showers or brushing her teeth either. Her daily routine was to hang out on the street smoking and trying to befriend drug addicts. They’d take her to their dealers, where she’d make a buy and then try to find out who was the next person up the ladder. Her work resulted in about three hundred arrests, everyone from two-bit drug sellers to major movers who organized the street-level crime from luxury apartments. Why’d she do it? According to the newspaper article relating her story, she loved the camaraderie of the department and its protect-and-serve mission. When she emerged from the undercover program, she was promoted to detective. Unfortunately, her three-year romantic partner had moved on, and it was difficult to get the bad memories out of her mind. Still, when the reporter asked whether she’d do it again, she said, “Yeah.”Kristina Goetz, “A Year of Living Dangerously Takes a Toll on Undercover Memphis Officer,” Commercial Appeal, August 30, 2009, accessed May 19, 2011, http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2009/aug/30/year-of-living-dangerously-takes-its-toll. *********READING MATERIALS******* https://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/business-ethics/s11-employee-s-ethics-making-the-b.html